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Don’t Be Afraid to Ask Your Boss

Professional & Managerial
Ask your boss first

It is coming close to the end of another busy year, and if you are like many others, you may have started thinking about what’s on your personal radar, and what’s next for your career.

Perhaps you’ve been in your current position for a few years and need a fresh challenge, or your interests have expanded and you’d like to find a new role to fit your growing skills. Whatever the reason, this period before the summer break is indeed a great time for taking stock, planning and beginning your search.

The natural inclination of many people is to start by looking outwards; what other organisations offer what I’m looking for?   However, have you fully considered what might be right there in front of you?

Before you go ahead and start hunting out in the market for that next job opportunity, you may want to consider these points:

  • Don’t underestimate the opportunity for new and challenging roles— within your current organisation.
  • If your boss is worth their salt, you shouldn’t be afraid of approaching them to discuss your career and letting them know you are ready for something new.
  • Make sure your employer knows you are serious about your career. Take accountability for ensuring you have that review meeting booked with your boss, and be prepared and ready to explain how and why you are ready to progress.
  • If, unfortunately, your direct Manager doesn’t seem interested, seek out another business or HR Manager you have a rapport with, to make your views heard. They may know something your boss doesn’t!
  • Organisations in this day and age are always looking to do things better, and there could quite possibly be a restructure in the pipeline. New opportunities for you?
  • Job hunting, even within your own business, can be frustrating. Don’t let the little things bug you. I know the saying “It’s the little things that get under your skin” but lift yourself above these things, and look at the bigger picture.

If you make your employer your first point of call for reviewing your career options, you won’t regret it, and your employer will appreciate the fact that you came to them first. Of course, If you don’t find anything suitable with your current organisation you can then go out to market, knowing you really have tried all the options internally first. When you find that new role, you can resign in confidence.

Beware though, of any counter offers from your boss at this stage. It’s not unusual to receive a reactive promise of increased pay and benefits, but it’s likely to be about their convenience, because you have already spoken with them regarding your career and job opportunities. In the long run it is rarely the right decision to accept a counter offer. Statistics show that within six months you will be looking again.


I’m a Principal Consultant with Madison Recruitment,  specialising in the Procurement and Property space and would invite you to make contact if you would like to discuss options in these sectors.